Commentary

2016 3rd Quarter Commentary – HOW IN THE WORLD DID WE GET THESE NEGATIVE INTEREST RATES?

2016 3rd Quarter Commentary

HOW IN THE WORLD DID WE GET THESE NEGATIVE INTEREST RATES?

One of the most common questions we have had over the last few years has been about negative interest rates and why they are bing imposed by central banks.  As recently as June of this year, the Swedish National Bank, Swiss National Bank, Denmark National Bank, European Central Bank, and the Bank of Japan all had negative interest rates.

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2015 – 4th Quarter TWO DOWN and TWO TO GO (A Follow Up)

As you may recall our 3rd quarter 2015 Commentary was titled Two Down and Two to Go. This referred to four events we felt needed to happen as the economy strengthened. THE FIRST was a -10% correction in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. That happened in the spring and summer of 2015 when the Dow went from 18,312 to a low of 15,666.

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2015 2nd Quarter Commentary – Choosing between Certainty and Uncertainty

Since the financial meltdown in 2008, the Federal Reserve has instituted 2 major policies. The first policy was to lower the Federal Funds interest rate to virtually zero and keep it there. The Fed has kept interest rates between 0% and 0.25% for the last six years. To keep interest rates this low for this long is unprecedented.

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2015 1st Quarter Commentary – The Case for Diversification

The 4th quarter of 2014 and the 1st quarter of 2015, when taken together, show a good example of the value of diversification. During October, November, and the first part of December the price of crude oil dropped precipitously. This unusually large drop in the price of oil effected many parts of the market. However, the three market sectors hit the hardest were:

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2014 2nd Quarter Commentary – A Few Thoughts on the Current Economy

In June, the Dow Jones Industrial Average briefly closed at an all-time high of 17,068. Obviously there is a lot of investment optimism for the U.S. stock market. Most economists agree that there is reason for long term optimism. However it would not be surprising to see a temporary correction before the market goes higher.

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